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against violence and rape, for equal pay and educational opportunities. on behalf of civil rights and women's rights. we've shown a bright light on women's rights from the powerful economic interest that profit at women's expense to the relishes fundamentalist. in the fall issue of "ms.," we celebrate these 40 years of impactful reporting. from the very first issue, with the abortion petition signed by 53 prominent women who had abortions when they were illegal to repeal our abortion laws. nearly 15 years before anita hill's fame mouse testimony. to our ground beaking reporting that defined genital mutilation as an international crime against women. to our 1996 look inside the taliban's regime before most of the media had even noticed right up to our 2011 story declaring rape is rape in which we revealed the f.b.i.'s 80-year-old definition of rape under counted rapes in this country by hundreds of thousands every year. that was part of a larger feminist campaign and kicked off a fire storm resulting in 140,000 e-mails and letters to the f.b.i. and attorney general demanding the de
from 1963 to 1967. he pushed for civil rights legislation. his father clarence mitchell, jr. was a long time lobbiest for the naacp. >> weather wise, a seasonable fall afternoon, temperatures in the upper 50s. not so bad for early october. 58 in mt. airy. 60 in cambridge. satellite radar view is clear but you see the impact in the upper great lakes. this cooler shot of air will arrive tomorrow night and into the day on saturday. it will not be bringing the winter weather. this evening, 50s. a few clouds, cool and pleasant. there are some changes as we go from friday night into your saturday. we'll detail it in minutes. >> the orioles will have to dust themselves off. >> everybody wants to know, does orioles magic have one more trick up that are sleeves. omazing coverage. >> looking down my sleeves. hey, listen. we got news off the field. joe girardi's father passed away from alzheimer's. he was a little broken up today. the orioles lineup will be the same as last night. buck is not making changes. derek jeter will not stop at short stop. he will be the designated hit are. he won't be pl
and civil rights leader, clarence mitchell iii, details on the death and one of the state's most prominent political families. game four of the alds. we hope the o's can pull out a win. now your maryland lottery midday numbers. >> ♪ the maryland lottery, let yourself play ♪ >> go o's. et's go to your pick three game. 5. 3. final numbers, 3. 5, 3, 3. we will get to your pick four in a moment. the latest ravens fan is katie from laurel, delaware. she won $6,000. find out how you can become a fan of the game. all set and ready to go with your four numbers. 0. 3. 0. last number, 9. 0, 3, 0, 9. the maryland lottery, let yourself play. >> thank you so much for joining us for 11 news at noon. we want to remind you to watch tonight. [captioning made possible by barnhill: you hear a lot of talk about question seven... so let me tell you what i know: if question seven passes, my company's going to... bring table games, like blackjack and poker... right here to baltimore. a twenty-five million dollar investment... that'll create five hundred new jobs. all right here. today, marylanders are spendi
to a balanced budget. condoleezza rice said education is the civil rights struggle of the day. >> condi dave a great speech at republican convention. i think we have to go toward school choice and voucher. the money as to follow the kids. my wife drew up in sweden. they actually have school choice in sweden. we can't have that here? what's the matter with us. do we think kids in baltimore shouldn't have a fare shake? they ought to be able to take the money and go to the schools they want to. >> we have 50 seconds. what is the and game in afghanistan. >> i thought we had a messing. right now we have bungled it. president obama told the taliban when we're leaving. >> we have 33 seconds and this is a big question. the healthcare reform act. new mr. romney said he will repeal it and replace it. do you lay grow with the plan and do you agree with replacing it. >> i hope my first plan will be to repeel it. >> he is the candidate for the 8th congressional district. to sew this interview or others, you can go to our website, abc2news.com/politics. don't forget to vote november 6th. >> we'll have mor
-conscious policy violated her civil and constitutional rights. in 2003 the supreme court endorsed the use of race as a factor in freshmen admissions. so, representative edwards, is affirmative action still necessary? >> absolutely, i think the commitment of the american dream actually rests with affirmative action, it requires it, i hope the supreme court does the right thing. >> i think that we're looking at different neutral different alternatives in talking about these issues on affirmative action. >> yeah, i agree. unfortunately until we start making serious changes in education system and i think it's necessary, affirmative action is necessary for inclusion and for diverse environment in the university system. >> i think 'farmtive action has become a crutch that we aren't revisiting education and how we're failing so many of our kids. until we do that maybe we do need it but i think we have failed our kids by not improving education. >> there was a very interesting article in "the atlantic" which is progressive publication talking about how affirmative action was giving higher scores to lati
into consideration as argument of>c[0 civil rights against an individual. falsely as it turned out later]ij1u of raping a young woman with a coke bottle in the st. francisúc hotel which ruined his career. is it a spectacle we crave in i> strongly suspect that should ross regains+íhl his elected position that san franciscans will be given a spectacle of7ñm, a long and hard working -- to show himself at the hel&m%sh mp of these issues with personal integrity and that is something which i submit we ei-are sorely in need of in this town. thank you9 p. >> well, i've been praying that i6g the lord would have me say the right words here and i've heard a lot of good speeches tor l. the best was that asian lady with the massage. that was a good÷Ñjpv one. this is totally reinstate him, give him double back pay and it's!z!/ all right. you should believe his wife also. okay? believe his wife. now -- and also i think the sheriff should go in there and sit down and dare anybody to arrest him, because he has been elected. the mayor has no auth
of civil rights, when first elected, he was one of the nation's youngest legislators. his son was also a delicate and is now a radio host here at wbal. >> i celebrate the great live that my father lived. the story he presented to all of us who are beneficiaries of his public policy initiative. >> his nephew says his uncle was a man like no other. he taught him about politics. >> he taught us what it meant to campaign, let's just say. he taught us how to knock on doors. he taught us to be close to people peeping he taught us about organization. you cannot just go out there and put your name on the ballot and expect people to votes. he said you always have to stay close to the people. he was the consummate politician and the consummate campaigner. >> but there were hard times. he served 16 months in federal prison after being convicted in 1987 of influence peddling. >> he had a smile on his face. he was just stronger. you know, they are not going to beat me down. he refused to let people beat him down. and even up into his passing, he was fighting. i saw him last week. >> no one's life i
.s. supreme court heard arguments today in the most important civil rights case to come before justices in the past six years. it's a challenge to the use of race as a factor in admissions at university of texas. >> and bay area students are watching this very carefully, and the uc regents are actively weigh inning. marianne favro is live with reaction tonight. >> reporter: here on campus a hearing today is resurrecting the debate over which factors should go into determining which students are aadmitted. it involves abigail fisher, a white woman that applied to the university of texas in 2008. she claims her race prevented her from getting accepted, and she's suing university. >> i hope the court rules that a student's race andette nis he city should not be considered when aapplying to the university of texas. >> reporter: the university of texas standing by it's policy. at san jose state we asked students if they thought race should be considered during admissions. >> it should be equal opportunity for everyone. >> i don't think race should be a factor in admissions because, you know,
and immigrants, whether it's civil rights, those things are on the line. and i just hope we don't see a repeat in the debate tomorrow night of the shame of that first debate where hispanics is and women and gay people and african-americans didn't even seem to exist in domestic policy. >> so, this is irreversible damage, for suburban women. would you agree with that, terry? >> oh, absolutely. i think suburban women are going -- are not going to vote for mitt romney. i think they see right through his deception. and i think that they actually, it's incredibly offensive and demeaning to women to treat us as if we're so stupid that we would believe this kind of hoaxerism. we're looking for a president that we can take at his word. barack obama is pro-choice and he means it when he says he's pro-choice. mitt romney will say anything and do anything and he is not the right president for women. >> i think all of us in our lifetime come across people who do business deals and they will say anything they possibly can to get the deal, close the deal at closing, and mitt romney comes off as one of these
organizations, which is kind of silly. he has compared himself to the naacp in the civil rights era in which there were secret donations were allowed. but of course rove is not martin luther king jr. >> cenk: really? yeah to say the least. >> people were fascinated like king was fighting for equal rights and rove and billionaires are fighting for tax breaks. not quite the same. >> cenk: it doesn't matter if you break the laws as the bush administration did because president obama looks forward he doesn't look backwards. he's going let you get away with anything anyway, he's encouraged by that, if you ask me. carl unger, thank you for "boss rove"." >> thank for having me, cenk. >> cenk: someone is not taking what the republicans are dishing out. the family of a navy seal who was actually killed in libya strikes back. >> one was a former navy seal, and glen doherty and you can imagine how shocked i was to learn that he was one of the two navy--former navy seals killed in bengahzi. >> cenk: wait until you see how shocked he is when his mom said, cut it out. i don't want you to talk about him an
as civil rights organizations. >> ifill: and this laib test whether any of those kind of things matter, i suppose. >> absolutely. >> ifill: marcia coyle. >> ifill: ray suarez has more on the larger stakes and potential fallout arising from today's arguments. >> suarez: and for that, we turn to o people who have been a big part the national conversation surrounding this case. debo adegbile is the acting president and director-counsel of the n.a.a.c.p. legal defense and educational fund, which filed an amicus brief in this case. and richard kahlenberg is a senior fellow at the century foundation. he wrote a recent report arguing for race-neutral admission policies that he says foster diversity. you were at the court, debo. what's at stake under coming classes of rising freshmen and their families sking admissio to public univsities this case? >> well, the stakes are very high. it's clear that everybody recognized today that diversity in higher education is a compelling interest. it's something that benefit all the-- all the students benefit from-- blark white, latino, asian. everybody ben
of african-americans born in the pre-civil rights rural south, that's a problem since many were delivered at home by midwives and recordkeeping was weak. the midwife who delivered raymond listed his first name as ramon and got his last name completely wrong, but his voter registration card has his correct name. >> do you vote? >> yes, i do. >> has this ever been a problem? >> voting? no, it hasn't been. >> reporter: but it could be now. rutherford says he can't get a photo id until he corrects his birth certificate, which requires an attorney he cannot afford. it is really difficult to get any kind of specific numbers as to how many voters could be impacted by the new south carolina law. according to the election commission, it could be anywhere from a high of 202,000 to a low of 51,000. >> i started looking at the numbers. i said, he is black, she's black, she's black, he -- i thought, god, this isracial. >> supporters of the new law says race has nothing to do with it. it's simply meant to protect against voter fraud, and there is a provision to allow voters like rutherford to cast a pr
: his dad thought civil rights were worth fighting for. as a teenager, mitt was less interested in the issues than being with his dad. >> the word from his family is that he was not necessarily interested in politics as ideology. but there was always something about his father and his father's power and his father's profession that kept him around and kept him close in a way that it didn't do that for other members of his family. (newsreel music plays) >> the eyes of the nation are on san francisco as the republican party convenes to nominate its choice for president. >> narrator: and in 1964, mitt traveled with his dad to watch him take on conservative republican senator barry goldwater. >> the republican party should unequivocally repudiate extremists of the right and the left, and reject their efforts to infiltrate or attach themselves to our party or its candidates. >> mitt is absorbing all of this. he sees his father basically taking a stand and admires his father greatly for this. >> narrator: but it was barry goldwater's convention. >> i would remind you that extremism in
folks lived the civil rights movement. i hope it happens there. at
of the people who affected the civil rights movement, for example, never held elected office. you look at people who were advocates for women's suffrage or a women's right to vote, they were never elected to office. i think it's instilling that motivation in young people, look, this is your opportunity in your forum. you don't have to have a lot of money. you don't have to be famous to build a movement behind an issue you think is important. and waywire is that platform to allow them to do it. this election obviously will be impacted by the young people who show up or don't show up in an election. but i think what's important is you've got to get more people involved in the process and educated. and the other thing that waywire is a much more serious social video platform. it's not just funny youtube videos or clips. it's actually a serious discussion about issues of the day. >> then we definitely are not interested. brian? we like the funny video. >> a lot of focus obviously on the yankees, but i want to talk about a different sport, hockey. you guys build this beautiful arena in newark, it emp
valued stocks with significant opportunity for improving dividend yield. >> all right. thank you, gentlemen, for a polite, civil conversation on the markets. we'll see you later. steve, see you on the countdown coming up. >> 15 minutes before the closing well. is it going to be polite and civil as we head to the close? the dow is right now lower by six points. so in negative territory once again. >> the authors of simpson-bowles warning politicians today they're about to feel the wrath of the american people for not working together to make a deal on our debt. listen. >> people are going to say to their elected representatives, look, i had to pay more interest because you guys didn't do anything. i'm getting it stuck right and left. you did this to me, now correct it. >> we'll talk about who's getting in the way of fixing this mess straight ahead. >>> also, wendy's cooking up a brand new logo for the first time in 30 years. when you see it, you might ask, why bother? is it all that different? we'll show it to you next. wooohooo....hahaahahaha! oh...there you go. wooohooo....hahaa
partially. we're proud of what we do but we don't have the actual data to support a strict finding right now so that would be my recommendation. and tom, i think you've heard a lot of great comments, not only from the civil grand jury but department heads and public comment of things. and i think some of our questioning that would be great to see going forward. so that would be my recommendation. for finding number one. for the recommendations, i'll take recommendations one through three almost together here. this is talking about increasing the number of commissioners, the at large commissioners, establishing a citizens advisory committee, or a nonprofit organization that talked about tom talked about a friends organization. again, we have a few ways we're able to respond here somewhat restrictive. what i'm going to suggest is that our responses that this requires further analysis i think. i know tom, being somewhat new in this role and it's great to hear that the civil grand jury obviously thinks highly of the current staff and is hopeful of what will happen in the future. i suggest as you
you very much. any other questions, colleagues? all right. i want to thank everyone who has presented and talked about -- and especially the civil grand jury for all of your hard work. obviously you put a lot of time and effort into this. i want to thank the different department heads that are here and those that are no longer here for coming out today. so before we get to our resolution and what we will adopt, i'd like to open this up for public comment. if there are any members of the public that wish to comment on this item, i have a number of cards. i will call you up to speak but otherwise if members of the public want to line up, you can come up one by one. everyone will have two minutes. michael adaro, paula dattish, bruce jesse, jane blotchy, and richard rothman. sorry if i butchered any of those 2345eu78s. forward. everyone will have two minutes. please line up on this side of the room. >> hello. mike adisaro, former past chairman of the liaison committee for the street artists program and i would like to play a small clip. this is from 1972. >> president farrell: sf gtv. we'
sides of the aisle right now. to some degree, that's why we don't get a solution to these important problems. steve, where is the civility that once existed in washington and the spirit of compromise we heard in the 1980s, for example? we keep hearing about the relationship between ronald reagan and tip o'neill and their willingness to compromise, even though they were about as far apart politically as you could get. >> bill, i agree with what you said and what rick said about that. i think it's wrong to say they're honest and they're the way they are because they're not in office anymore. i think what's more correct is they both come from an era where you fought, and you fought hard. but once the vote was taken, you know, they were kind of done. it wasn't really a scorched-earth policy. i grew up in a household where there were many politicians held in high esteem. they were guys like jacob javitz who were held in high esteem. >> reread "alexander hamilton." there's never been civility in politics. >> that comes and goes. that's a cyclical situation. we had a civil war. that was th
't rely on agencies that were once never perfect? >> that is right. i was always something. what the government is trying to measure a gigantic economy. the civil servants are working hard at this. a number of different administrations, 83 out of 84 have been questioned by wall street analysts. earlier in the year, they advise the analyst is as they don't look at the weekly revisions. use again the four-week moving average, which we are seeing in those numbers, 362,000, that is the lowest drop -- the biggest drop in about six months. that tends to smooth out and knock out things, rather than temporary automotive factory shutdowns and the like three. lou: what we saw smooth out they were those indexes. the markets. the markets are just rebelling. we watched today, and the professional money in there. let's be very clear about this. these are the professionals going back, saying that we don't want the numbers on earnings, we don't like what we are seeing along the bottom of this market, and we don't like the fact that we get a big number in the morning from the labor department and
civil commitment. >> professor. >> i'm going to add, do this a little bit shorter, i think, which is let's start with a question to everybody in the audience. all right, so if you like chocolate cake, raise your left hand. if you do not like chocolate cake, raise your right hand. all people who like chocolate cake left hand, don't like chocolate cake right hand. all right, hands down. how many people found it difficult to raise your hand by yourself? not very many. great, you made a choice. you thought about it. you decided and you acted. and my concept of what free will is the ability to act consistent with your preferences and desires. just that simple. now how many people here feel like you have control over whether or not you like chocolate cake? raise either hands. fewer, right. so there are two different things going on that we often conflate when we talk about free will. one is your predispositions to preferences and desires, ok. that may be impulsivity, that may be violence, that may be anti-social personality disorder, that may be a preference for chocolate cake, a preference fo
, and when we talk about the sacred texts that guide civil religious ideals in a country like america, we think about the declaration of independence - "that all people have inalienable rights." well, some folks have not gotten inalienable rights here, and we've had classes on native american spirituality, and we don't need to rehearse the whole negative scene with african american, native american, immigrants, people who didn't measure up to some kind of ideal, literally white-washed image of what the american mythos was. but we've been working on it now for 20 years to try to straighten that out, you don't want to be disingenuous, but realize that civil religion, like religion, is usually about raising up the ideal over the actual physical reality. sure. >> it seems to me, and maybe i'm wrong, but everything else that we've discussed discusses unity and inclusion. this starts to discuss exclusion. >> yes. and that's why i like to bring it up. in some senses, it turns the myth-ritual dimensional triangle on its head, because then again, it's not about religion. but it sure shows the powe
distribution based on "free will or volitional control" which applies on the civil side and used to apply under the a.l.i. test and now we have a new distribution of being able to distinguish right from wrong. so now we have two completely different distributions that we're drawing that bright line on. >> competent versus volitional. we can decide that cognitive isn't sufficient, but it is the basis where we draw the line. sorry. >> ok. so to get back to the science, do you see how the research that you're doing and this imaging and identification of areas in the brain that may be part of primarily psychopathy which we're talking about today, how would that be used in the courtroom? what is your opinion? >> classically individuals who have those trades, the lack of empathy, those traits predict future recidivism. if you're an offender and scored very high on those traits, you have a four to eight times increased risk of reoffending when released if you're an inmate. it is an construct on a future dangerness issue and used in risk assessment. the literature has done, it has helped us to understa
mr. obama but then the whole debate he used that civility to mask a total lack of deference. i get the sense he was looking at the president right in the eye for an hour and a half with total disdain. i think the president to his discredit couldn't handle it. he sh you had have looked him in the eye and said, this knit whit, who is he. whatever it takes to stare down a guy who doesn't like you. >> like i'm staring you down. >> no, you do it nicely. there are a couple of things, quite seriously. if i were joe biden, i'm not joe biden, i'd go after a couple of things hard. how does an 82-year-old or 92-year-old man, get on their bicycle, the car, rent a cab, they go out and find an insurance policy to cover them? there's no such insurance company that's going to insure them. this thing about a voucher is fantastic, literally fantastic. secondly, personhood. do you really mean to say that a fertilized human egg, whatever your philosophy or religion, should have the rights of property, should have the rights of liberty? what does that mean except it takes the mother's role and casts it
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)

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